Achtung:

Sie haben Javascript deaktiviert!
Sie haben versucht eine Funktion zu nutzen, die nur mit Javascript möglich ist. Um sämtliche Funktionalitäten unserer Internetseite zu nutzen, aktivieren Sie bitte Javascript in Ihrem Browser.

Bildnachweis: Musikwissenschaftliches Seminar/Universität Paderborn Bildinformationen anzeigen
Bildnachweis: Musikwissenschaftliches Seminar / Universität Paderborn Bildinformationen anzeigen
Bildnachweis HfM Detmold/Frank Beyer Bildinformationen anzeigen
Bildnachweis HfM Detmold/Frank Beyer Bildinformationen anzeigen
Bildinformationen anzeigen
Bildnachweis: Musikwissenschaftliches Seminar / Universität Paderborn Bildinformationen anzeigen

Bildnachweis: Musikwissenschaftliches Seminar/Universität Paderborn

Bildnachweis: Musikwissenschaftliches Seminar / Universität Paderborn

Foto: Musikwissenschaftliches Seminar / Universität Paderborn

Bildnachweis HfM Detmold/Frank Beyer

Bildnachweis HfM Detmold/Frank Beyer

Bildnachweis: Musikwissenschaftliches Seminar / Universität Paderborn

|

Digital-Humanities-Ringvorlesung: Semesterauftakt mit Lou Burnard (Oxford)

Für den Auftakt der Ringvorlesung “Wissensmodellierung durch Markup” am Di. 9. April  (16 Uhr, Hörsaal H7 am Campus Paderborn) konnte mit Lou Burnard (Oxford) ein ‘Urgestein’ der Text Encoding Initiative – gewonnen werden.
Burnard wird zum Thema “Modelling meaning: a short history of text markup” sprechen. Er erläutert: “Not so long ago (about 30 years ago to be precise), it was easy to decide how to process text by computer. If you wanted to store and then print the text out nicely, you would use one kind of software. If you wanted to analyse the text linguistically (yes, people did that 30 years ago too), you'd use another. And if you were really interested in what the text was *about*, then you would probably throw the text away and use a database. But then someone realised that actually it might be more fun to combine all three kinds of process -- dealing with the text as an image, as a linguistic construct, and as a body of assertions about the real world -- and the need for a new kind of markup was born. In this talk I'll give a biassed and unreliable account of some key moments in the evolution of our current markup systems: from the corporate database of the 1970s to today's world wide web of documents and tomorrow's web of data, by way of SGML, TEI, XML, and other acronyms. Time permitting, I'll also try to explain why data and text are not so different after all.”

Herzliche Einladung!

Daniel Röwenstrunk und Peter Stadler